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​A versatile African staple food

​A versatile African staple food

Published by Inna on 25th Jun 2021

Here we are talking about yet another Nigerian (African) food. It’s so exciting!!! As I said before African food is so creative and used in so many different ways, and this staple food is no exception! We are talking today about one of the many variations of African powders, that are commonly used to make a dough, which usually accompanies a soup such as EgusiEfo RiroOgbono etc.

First of all let’s talk about how this product is obtained. For this specific flour, cassava tubers are peeled, well cleaned and grated or crushed. After this, the excess water is removed. Once the water is dried, the powder is sieved and fried - can be done with palm oil or without. Depending on the way it is fried it can be yellow (fried with palm oil) or white (fried without palm oil).

                                                                                                                             

The powder thus obtained can be prepared in many different ways. For example, my husband loves to eat it mixed with powdered milk and water, sugar and roasted groundnuts. It can also, be consumed the same way but without water or milk. Moreover, it can be sprinkled on top of soft cooked beans.

                      

The most popular way it is consumed is by making a gummy dough that can be eaten with all kind of different soups like OkraEfo Riro etc. This dough is called eba. Yeah, I am sure you now know (if you haven’t already guessed) that I am talking about Garri.

It took me quite some time to get used with Garri. At the beginning I thought it is tasteless when cooked like eba so I used to put salt in it when cooking :D. Then my husband explained to me that I am not supposed to chew it, and I should just swallow it, so it is not supposed to have any taste. Especially because the soup that usually is consumed with it is full of flavour. I still can’t swallow it directly without chewing, but at least now I am not adding any salt to it :)).

I am sure there are many other ways of eating Garri, and, as I said before, this is way I love African (Nigerian) food, because it is so versatile and ‘ingenious’. What is your favourite way of eating Garri?